&

Master Card priceless cities mexico-city
Le fooding logo
Mexico City

Molino El Pujol

Mexico City

Molino El Pujol

BEST NEW BISTRO

Molino El Pujol

shortlisted by Lefooding

WHO
The top Latino American chef, Enrique Olvera, decided to open a tortilla shop and a small open kitchen in the heart of Mexico City’s trendy Condesa neighborhood, called Molino el Pujol, honoring his famous restaurant El Pujol that’s been rated among the world’s best restaurants. Olvera, along with many other Mexican chefs, is part of the new tortilla movement that has popularized and restored the taste of authentic, traditional Mexican tortillas.

FOOD
Order inside where a black letter menu board on the wall is displayed behind the very helpful and knowledgeable staff.
One encounters, like in any authentic and traditional tortilla shop, plain tortillas wrapped in newspaper that are sold by the dozen or the kilo, made from varieties of native corn that vary in color, consistency and taste (amarillo, rojo, zapoteco, mixteco). A dozen costs between $18.50 to $21 pesos and a kilo around $50 or $57 pesos.

For breakfast, order one of the three tamal options, which is, in its most basic form, a corn-based masa wrapped around a filling and steamed in a corn husk or banana leaf (prices between $30 and $50 pesos). I picked the huitlacoche one (a fungus that grows on corn), it was very soft and velvety, plus this incredible mushroom adds a smoky flavor. The pineapple and chepil ones caught my attention too. Chepil is a legume with tiny leaves that is used in the traditional tamales de chepil and is an important ingredient in Oaxacan cuisine.
You can also have baked beans in a clay pot called frijol olla, which is probably the most common Mexican dish.
For lunch, there are many great choices. They have typical elote (Mexican sweet corn) with mayonnaise and butter on it. Or order the restaurant’s star choice, the aguacate (avocado) taco on a blue corn tortilla pressed with hoja santa (Mexican pepperleaf) and finished with a quesadilla or quelite (quelite means “edible herb” and comes from the Náhuatl word “quilitl”).

DRINKS
Breakfast Drinks:
Café de olla, a traditional Mexican coffee beverage made with coffee, cinnamon and piloncillo (unrefined whole cane sugar), $45 pesos
Atole, a warming drink that’s perfect for winter, thickened with masa and conforming vanilla and cinnamon flavors, $20 pesos
Campechano, a hot Mexican beverage that’s a cross between a café de olla and an atole

All day drinks:
Agua de maïz translated as “corn water,” made with corn, sugar and water. So good and refreshing. This is the perfect drink to accompany all these corn tapas.
Maïz Azul beer from Morelia, Michoacán, an artisanal lager-style beer also made with corn!

DECOR
A tiny white building that’s decorated outside with three large cacti and the restaurant´s name hand-painted in black on the wall, complementing the Condesa’s art deco architecture. Three tables outside to enjoy the tranquility of a beautiful street full of palm trees.
Inside, a lovely but small open kitchen furnished with the old tortilla-making machine separated by a concrete bar. Many objects are displayed on it: a frijol blanco basket, miltomate, maiz negro zapoteco that you can buy and a beautiful old scale (not for sale!).
On the other side, there’s a wooden counter-table to receive customers. Some beautiful illustrations by Hilda Palafox honoring the corn harvest and milling process hang on the handmade while tile walls.

NOISE
Lots of interesting noises! From the ingredients and utensils used in the kitchen to the Afro-Colombian music, this place will make you feel alive. I Shazamed Rebelión and the famous song En Barranquilla Me Quedo by Joe Arroyo.

SEATING
Few seats, it’s more like a coffee shop, meant as more of a quick stop!
Inside, six wooden chairs can be found with black metallic stools.

VIBE
The vibe totally borrows from the coffee world. Local, international visitors from all genders, styles and social classes convene here.

RESTROOMS
The restrooms were clean and even had a speaker where the native music was even louder.

SERVICE
The staff is very attentive and kind. They guide you through the menu providing precise details as if they know all the recipes by heart.

WOULD RECOMMEND
A humble place honoring authentic Mexican food and community. A corn sanctuary. It’s a must!

WHO
The top Latino American chef, Enrique Olvera, decided to open a tortilla shop and a small open kitchen in the heart of Mexico City’s trendy Condesa neighborhood, called Molino el Pujol, honoring his famous restaurant El Pujol that’s been rated among the world’s best restaurants. Olvera, along with many other Mexican chefs, is part of the new tortilla movement that has popularized and restored the taste of authentic, traditional Mexican tortillas.

FOOD
Order inside where a black letter menu board on the wall is displayed behind the very helpful and knowledgeable staff.
One encounters, like in any authentic and traditional tortilla shop, plain tortillas wrapped in newspaper that are sold by the dozen or the kilo, made from varieties of native corn that vary in color, consistency and taste (amarillo, rojo, zapoteco, mixteco). A dozen costs between $18.50 to $21 pesos and a kilo around $50 or $57 pesos.

For breakfast, order one of the three tamal options, which is, in its most basic form, a corn-based masa wrapped around a filling and steamed in a corn husk or banana leaf (prices between $30 and $50 pesos). I picked the huitlacoche one (a fungus that grows on corn), it was very soft and velvety, plus this incredible mushroom adds a smoky flavor. The pineapple and chepil ones caught my attention too. Chepil is a legume with tiny leaves that is used in the traditional tamales de chepil and is an important ingredient in Oaxacan cuisine.
You can also have baked beans in a clay pot called frijol olla, which is probably the most common Mexican dish.
For lunch, there are many great choices. They have typical elote (Mexican sweet corn) with mayonnaise and butter on it. Or order the restaurant’s star choice, the aguacate (avocado) taco on a blue corn tortilla pressed with hoja santa (Mexican pepperleaf) and finished with a quesadilla or quelite (quelite means “edible herb” and comes from the Náhuatl word “quilitl”).

DRINKS
Breakfast Drinks:
Café de olla, a traditional Mexican coffee beverage made with coffee, cinnamon and piloncillo (unrefined whole cane sugar), $45 pesos
Atole, a warming drink that’s perfect for winter, thickened with masa and conforming vanilla and cinnamon flavors, $20 pesos
Campechano, a hot Mexican beverage that’s a cross between a café de olla and an atole

All day drinks:
Agua de maïz translated as “corn water,” made with corn, sugar and water. So good and refreshing. This is the perfect drink to accompany all these corn tapas.
Maïz Azul beer from Morelia, Michoacán, an artisanal lager-style beer also made with corn!

DECOR
A tiny white building that’s decorated outside with three large cacti and the restaurant´s name hand-painted in black on the wall, complementing the Condesa’s art deco architecture. Three tables outside to enjoy the tranquility of a beautiful street full of palm trees.
Inside, a lovely but small open kitchen furnished with the old tortilla-making machine separated by a concrete bar. Many objects are displayed on it: a frijol blanco basket, miltomate, maiz negro zapoteco that you can buy and a beautiful old scale (not for sale!).
On the other side, there’s a wooden counter-table to receive customers. Some beautiful illustrations by Hilda Palafox honoring the corn harvest and milling process hang on the handmade while tile walls.

NOISE
Lots of interesting noises! From the ingredients and utensils used in the kitchen to the Afro-Colombian music, this place will make you feel alive. I Shazamed Rebelión and the famous song En Barranquilla Me Quedo by Joe Arroyo.

SEATING
Few seats, it’s more like a coffee shop, meant as more of a quick stop!
Inside, six wooden chairs can be found with black metallic stools.

VIBE
The vibe totally borrows from the coffee world. Local, international visitors from all genders, styles and social classes convene here.

RESTROOMS
The restrooms were clean and even had a speaker where the native music was even louder.

SERVICE
The staff is very attentive and kind. They guide you through the menu providing precise details as if they know all the recipes by heart.

WOULD RECOMMEND
A humble place honoring authentic Mexican food and community. A corn sanctuary. It’s a must!

CHEF

Enrique Olvera

OPENING HOURS

Open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

RESERVATIONS

No reservations are possible

Sign up now to get all news

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Your subscription to the newsletter has been confirmed.

You can unsubscribe anytime. Please read our Protection of Personal Data to learn more about how we process your personal data.