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Mexico City

Enomoto

BEST NEW BISTRO

Enomoto

SHORTLISTED BY BISTRONAUT #10

WHO
Enomoto Coffee, located in the Japanese epicenter (also known as the Cuauhtémoc neighborhood), is part of the Edo Kobayashi Group and transitions by night into Le Tachinomi Desu.
Founded in 2013, the Edo Kobayashi Group is one of the most popular Japanese restaurant groups in Mexico City, looking to combine “the perfect balance between savor and nutrition,” to use their own words.
Chef Edo Kobayashi, originally from Tijuana, Baja California and passionate about Japanese culture, has opened thirteen restaurants in both Mexico and the U.S. The first one was the emblematic Rokai restaurant, an izakaya concept.

FOOD
Everything at Enomoto Coffee, from the menu to the locale or the content of the plates, is the embodiment of Japanese minimalism and refinement, without pretention. 
The menu features 10 different types of sandwiches, or more precisely “sandos,” like the Japanese call them (a name that perfectly fits the Mexican language), and a dozen coffee and tea drinks.
House favorites are indicated by a little pointing finger, which we highly recommend. The sandos have 3 or 4 ingredients max, and are cut into 3 geometrical slices, a pleasure for the eyes and the taste buds.
In Enomoto, you are invited to discover another side of Japanese food and atmosphere: casual dining with your hands, standing at the bar, far from ceremonial meals. Simple and delightful.

Main courses:
Sandos: The bread prepared in a brioche style is thick but very light. This beautiful cubicle produced in a bakery nearby fits the Japanese design.
Sando pesto: A layer of homemade shiso (a type of Japanese mint) pesto, with avocado sliced thinly on top and covered in a generous layer of grated parmesan. A subtle combination of ingredients coming from very different cuisines.
The ebi katsu: Shrimp, katsu sauce and tarutaru mayonnaise.
We really appreciated the different textures of this sando, the softness of the bread, the density of the practically raw shrimp and the crunchiness surrounding them. The shrimp have a lot of flavor. The sauce is sweet and sour, like Japanese cuisine does so well, with subtle notes of plums.

DRINKS
The coffee is really the star of the menu.
It is preciously handled and weighted to exactly the right gram. The barista uses precise gestures and the blends are carefully selected from the country’s best coffee plantations.
All drinks involving espresso are from a Oaxacan blend, the Aeropress only uses a special blend from Veracruz and the cold brew is an “ensemble” of beans from Puebla, Oaxaca, Veracruz and Chiapas.
One of the house specialties is the espresso tonica: the quinine flavor, the saltiness of the sparking water and the toasted flavor of the coffee mix beautifully, but the prize goes to the carajillo (not on the menu). This typical Mexican drink is an espresso shot, usually mixed with Licor 43 over ice and shaken well. Here the licor is homemade using sugar, vodka, anise and cinnamon. The result is spectacular, so well shaken, its foam dense and creamy like homemade whipped cream.

DECOR
The red brick wall, concrete floors, exposed wires and the black fence dividing the space are reminiscent of the New York industrial style. The marble-like counter brings sophistication to the place and the delicate Japanese ceramics add a touch of refinement, all creating a pleasant space for a snack.
As a unique decor touch, the walls are covered with alcohol bottles, reminding us that the space was actually first designed as a bar.

NOISE
The place is an oasis of calm right near the busy Rio Tiber street.

SEATING
No seating, no cutlery, everyone eats with their hands while standing. However, there is one small bench outside for enjoying the Mexican sunlight.

VIBE
The small space, shaped like a narrow hallway, is for neighbors, regulars, morning wanderers, those in a hurry, those who like coffee. Leaning on the bar, you can observe the back and forth of suppliers delivering alcohol to the bar, or the personnel from the group’s other nearby restaurant coming for a question or a chat.

RESTROOMS
The dark, single restroom contributes to this feeling of a place that is so many things at the same time. To get there, you have to go through the (beautifully lit) cellar, past the freezer and next to a small office table where someone is crunching numbers. It’s a strange and exciting feeling to be admitted to this area that’s usually restricted to clients, the backstage of the business.

SERVICE
Great service. The barista likes his job and is available for a good chat over the counter.

WOULD RECOMMEND
The perfect place for a quality snack! 

WHO
Enomoto Coffee, located in the Japanese epicenter (also known as the Cuauhtémoc neighborhood), is part of the Edo Kobayashi Group and transitions by night into Le Tachinomi Desu.
Founded in 2013, the Edo Kobayashi Group is one of the most popular Japanese restaurant groups in Mexico City, looking to combine “the perfect balance between savor and nutrition,” to use their own words.
Chef Edo Kobayashi, originally from Tijuana, Baja California and passionate about Japanese culture, has opened thirteen restaurants in both Mexico and the U.S. The first one was the emblematic Rokai restaurant, an izakaya concept.

FOOD
Everything at Enomoto Coffee, from the menu to the locale or the content of the plates, is the embodiment of Japanese minimalism and refinement, without pretention. 
The menu features 10 different types of sandwiches, or more precisely “sandos,” like the Japanese call them (a name that perfectly fits the Mexican language), and a dozen coffee and tea drinks.
House favorites are indicated by a little pointing finger, which we highly recommend. The sandos have 3 or 4 ingredients max, and are cut into 3 geometrical slices, a pleasure for the eyes and the taste buds.
In Enomoto, you are invited to discover another side of Japanese food and atmosphere: casual dining with your hands, standing at the bar, far from ceremonial meals. Simple and delightful.

Main courses:
Sandos: The bread prepared in a brioche style is thick but very light. This beautiful cubicle produced in a bakery nearby fits the Japanese design.
Sando pesto: A layer of homemade shiso (a type of Japanese mint) pesto, with avocado sliced thinly on top and covered in a generous layer of grated parmesan. A subtle combination of ingredients coming from very different cuisines.
The ebi katsu: Shrimp, katsu sauce and tarutaru mayonnaise.
We really appreciated the different textures of this sando, the softness of the bread, the density of the practically raw shrimp and the crunchiness surrounding them. The shrimp have a lot of flavor. The sauce is sweet and sour, like Japanese cuisine does so well, with subtle notes of plums.

DRINKS
The coffee is really the star of the menu.
It is preciously handled and weighted to exactly the right gram. The barista uses precise gestures and the blends are carefully selected from the country’s best coffee plantations.
All drinks involving espresso are from a Oaxacan blend, the Aeropress only uses a special blend from Veracruz and the cold brew is an “ensemble” of beans from Puebla, Oaxaca, Veracruz and Chiapas.
One of the house specialties is the espresso tonica: the quinine flavor, the saltiness of the sparking water and the toasted flavor of the coffee mix beautifully, but the prize goes to the carajillo (not on the menu). This typical Mexican drink is an espresso shot, usually mixed with Licor 43 over ice and shaken well. Here the licor is homemade using sugar, vodka, anise and cinnamon. The result is spectacular, so well shaken, its foam dense and creamy like homemade whipped cream.

DECOR
The red brick wall, concrete floors, exposed wires and the black fence dividing the space are reminiscent of the New York industrial style. The marble-like counter brings sophistication to the place and the delicate Japanese ceramics add a touch of refinement, all creating a pleasant space for a snack.
As a unique decor touch, the walls are covered with alcohol bottles, reminding us that the space was actually first designed as a bar.

NOISE
The place is an oasis of calm right near the busy Rio Tiber street.

SEATING
No seating, no cutlery, everyone eats with their hands while standing. However, there is one small bench outside for enjoying the Mexican sunlight.

VIBE
The small space, shaped like a narrow hallway, is for neighbors, regulars, morning wanderers, those in a hurry, those who like coffee. Leaning on the bar, you can observe the back and forth of suppliers delivering alcohol to the bar, or the personnel from the group’s other nearby restaurant coming for a question or a chat.

RESTROOMS
The dark, single restroom contributes to this feeling of a place that is so many things at the same time. To get there, you have to go through the (beautifully lit) cellar, past the freezer and next to a small office table where someone is crunching numbers. It’s a strange and exciting feeling to be admitted to this area that’s usually restricted to clients, the backstage of the business.

SERVICE
Great service. The barista likes his job and is available for a good chat over the counter.

WOULD RECOMMEND
The perfect place for a quality snack! 

CHEF

Edo Kobayashi

OPENING HOURS

Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.. Closed Sundays.

RESERVATIONS

By phone +52(55) 5919 1253 

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